“Would You Want to Have a Relationship With the Shoe Shop Around the Corner?”

I recently read a thought-provoking article called Double Down on Facebook Marketing http://bit.ly/xrcNPu. The article explores whether or not Facebook marketing for businesses is over rated.  It suggests that you need 10,000 fans before you start seeing a return.  It emphasizes that only 1% of Facebook fans interact with brands.   It concludes that despite the low engagement among fans and the long-term (2 yr) commitment to build the fan base, it’s ultimately worth it when you get there.

My initial thoughts were fuck what’s going to happen if all I can deliver in 6 months or a year is a few hundred fans and I’m only talking to myself? What’s the point?

The author seems to be right.  My observations and experience leads me to believe that the 1% interaction rate is the norm and that 2 years of day in day out dedication is what it takes to build a good fan base.

I thought about some of the more successful local small businesses.  They have around 1000 fans and seem to get a few to a dozen interactions on their posts.

Then I realized that thinking about it in terms of fan count, number of likes, and such is misguided.  It’s part of it but it’s not about that.  It’s about developing relationships with people.  I posted a comment that mentioned that.  Then a guy replied “Do you really want a relationship with the local shoe shop around the corner?”  What a great question.  I thought about it.

It depends on the shoe shop, right?  You would or wouldn’t want a relationship with the shoe shop for the same reasons I would or wouldn’t want a relationship with my neighbor.  What does the local shoe shop add to my life?  If it’s just the same shoes I can buy at twenty other stores around town, snotty sales people, and daily updates aimed at getting me to buy shoes then no thanks, I’ll pass.  If they are a high-end fashion type shoe shop that helps keep me looking stylish and on the cutting edge of fashion…I’d still pass but my girlfriend wouldn’t.  If you’re brand or business is boring and has no social value beyond meeting demand with supply then social media isn’t for you.  Maybe 21st century business isn’t for you….

However, there are a lot of boring “shoe shops around the corner” that want to harness the power of social media.  I can’t limit my market to fun and interesting brands and businesses.  There aren’t that many and they don’t need my help anyways.  They set up a Facebook page and people find them.  When the boring shoe shop hires me I basically need to make them interesting.

It can’t be about shoes all the time.  Behind every small business is a small business owner with interests, hobbies, passions, and stories.  It could be about that.  It could be about a cause like raising money for a local animal shelter.  It could be about local happenings, sports, pop culture, and funny stuff.  Who made the rule that a shoe shop shouldn’t post a funny picture of a meat tray replica of a stadium around Super Bowl time?

The brand/business has to be interesting first and a business second.  The brand has to become human to be worthy of a social relationship.  Would you be friends with your neighbor if he knocked on your door everyday and blurted out, “30% discount on penny loafers today from 2pm to 4pm”?  Then, why the hell do marketers think we should?  They scratch there heads on 1% engagement and say well if we have 1,000,000 fans 1% is a lot of people…

The other 990,000 looks like a big missed opportunity to me.  I guess I’m starting to realize that my real job is going to be to dust off your tired old boring brand and give it life to make it interesting.  It all boils down to “do you really want a relationship with the shoe shop around the corner?”

It’s invigorating because instead of seeing increasing competition from other social media marketers and a decreasing market as more and more businesses throw up Facebook pages, I now see potential clients everywhere and a way to stand above the rest.